All Articles

Resveratrol: Promoting longevity through a myriad of properties

Article
July 13, 2022
By
Ehab Naim, MBA.

Resveratrol has drawn attention due to its numerous biological effects, like anticancer, antimicrobial, cardioprotective, antidiabetic, and antiaging properties .

Compound description

Resveratrol is a non-flavonoid polyphenol found in many fruits and vegetables, like peanuts, berries, and grapes (1, 2). This bioactive compound has drawn attention due to its numerous biological effects, like anticancer, antimicrobial, cardioprotective, antidiabetic, and antiaging properties (2, 3). In addition, resveratrol has been found to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant characteristics (4, 5).

 Properties

For decades, resveratrol has been investigated by many researchers for its various properties. It produces many of its effects by modulating several pathways (2). For example, the literature indicates that the bioactive compound is an activator of SIRT1 (a member of the sirtuin family of proteins) (5). SIRT1 is involved in cell survival, senescence, metabolism, inflammation and stress resistance(2). This, in opinion of some researchers, makes resveratrol a potential game changer in aging and longevity interventions (2, 3, 6).

The literature indicates that in addition to SIRT1, resveratrol plays a role in the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway (2). The latter pathway plays a role in inflammation and aging. The bioactive molecule has been found to promote NF-κB, therefore decreasing inflammatory mediators, like interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor-α (7). The outcome is the inhibition of inflammation, which can be used to treat many age-related diseases and promote healthy aging.

In its capacity as an anti-inflammatory agent, resveratrol has also been found to inhibit cyclooxygenases (2). The latter are enzymes that convert arachidonic acid into prostaglandin (lipid-based molecules that play a role in inflammation signaling and initiation). Suppression of the said pathway has been suggested to reduce inflammation (2). This highlights the resveratrol value in controlling a process that accelerates aging.

The antioxidant capacity of resveratrol has also been highlighted in the literature. In this context, research has shown that the bioactive molecule modulates the activity of nuclear factor erythroid-2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) (5, 7). NrF2 activation with resveratrol promotes antioxidant enzymes, like superoxide dismutase and catalase. The outcome of this process is reactive oxygen species (ROS) suppression, reducing oxidative stress (7). Excess ROS accelerates the aging process and the development of age-related disorders.

Based on the above, resveratrol acts on multiple processes and pathways within the body to promote healthy aging and longevity (3). Through these pathways, it produces many of its antiaging, cardioprotective, neuroprotective, and anti-inflammatory properties (2, 3, 5).

 

Use as a supplement

The value of resveratrol has been explored in both preclinical and clinical settings. In this context, researchers have highlighted the value of this bioactive compound in combating age-related pathologies, like cardiovascular disorders, neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes, and others (2, 7).

The cardioprotective properties of resveratrol have been highlighted in the literature, but some results are inconclusive. For example, clinical studies have shown that resveratrol supplementation improved ventricular function and reduced low-density lipoprotein (bad cholesterol) (2, 8). Also, the bioactive compound has been found to improve endothelial function, preventing atherosclerosis and coronary artery diseases. Further investigations revealed that resveratrol reduces inflammatory mediators and mechanisms that mediate atherosclerosis (2, 9). Other cardiovascular effects of the compound were reduced blood pressure and oxidative stress. These outcomes were attributed to resveratrol's antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, which are critical in fighting age-related diseases and promoting healthy longevity (2, 7). It is important to note that further research is needed to verify the effectiveness of this compound.

Through its ability to modulate SIRT1, 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, and its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, resveratrol has been hypothesized to be helpful in neurological disorders like Alzheimer’s disease and ischemic stroke (2, 10, 11). These studies have highlighted the capacity of the bioactive compound to fortify the brain by reducing inflammatory mediators’ permeability.

The value of resveratrol in glycemic control has also been explored in clinical studies. In this context, resveratrol use was found to improve glycated hemoglobin (a marker of glycemic control over three months) (2, 12). Also, the bioactive compound has been suggested to reduce insulin resistance and blood glucose and delay glucose peak after meals (2, 13). Also, the antioxidant properties of the molecule help fight oxidative stress, a contributor to insulin resistance and subsequent type 2 diabetes (2). It is important to note that some of these results do not help derive a definitive conclusion. 

The doses used in clinical studies ranged from 150mg to 3000mg. In our Marketplace under the vendor DoNotAge, you can find resveratrol as capsules (Pure Resveratrol). Pure Resveratrol provides the body with 1000mg of the bioactive molecule per serving (serving is two capsules). Also, DoNotAge provides resveratrol in micronized powder dosage form (Pure Resveratrol Powder).

 

Side effects

In small doses, resveratrol appears to be safe (14). Higher doses or more extended periods of use were not associated with serious adverse events. Examples include diarrhea, heartburn, increased or decreased appetite, vivid dreams, hot flashes, insomnia, flatulence, and other mild gastrointestinal (GIT) symptoms. In certain instances, like high doses, mild-to-moderate adverse events appeared, including the abovementioned GIT symptoms, chest pain, pruritis, itchy eyes, and dry mouth, among others (14). The literature indicates that the use of ≥500mg for prolonged periods produces reversible adverse events. Resveratrol is an inhibitor of cytochrome P450; therefore, it could interact with many medications. It is recommended to use this supplement only after consulting a licensed healthcare professional, like a physician or pharmacist.

References

1.            Ahmadi Z, Mohammadinejad R, Ashrafizadeh M. Drug delivery systems for resveratrol, a non-flavonoid polyphenol: Emerging evidence in last decades. Journal of Drug Delivery Science and Technology. 2019;51:591-604.

2.            Berman AY, Motechin RA, Wiesenfeld MY, Holz MK. The therapeutic potential of resveratrol: a review of clinical trials. npj Precision Oncology. 2017;1(1):35.

3.            Zhang L-X, Li C-X, Kakar MU, Khan MS, Wu P-F, Amir RM, et al. Resveratrol (RV): A pharmacological review and call for further research. Biomedicine & Pharmacotherapy. 2021;143:112164.

4.            Madeo F, Carmona-Gutierrez D, Hofer SJ, Kroemer G. Caloric Restriction Mimetics against Age-Associated Disease: Targets, Mechanisms, and Therapeutic Potential. Cell Metabolism. 2019;29(3):592-610.

5.            Smoliga JM, Baur JA, Hausenblas HA. Resveratrol and health – A comprehensive review of human clinical trials. Molecular Nutrition & Food Research. 2011;55(8):1129-41.

6.            Patel KR, Scott E, Brown VA, Gescher AJ, Steward WP, Brown K. Clinical trials of resveratrol. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. 2011;1215(1):161-9.

7.            Zhou D-D, Luo M, Huang S-Y, Saimaiti A, Shang A, Gan R-Y, et al. Effects and Mechanisms of Resveratrol on Aging and Age-Related Diseases. Oxidative medicine and cellular longevity. 2021;2021:9932218-.

8.            Magyar K, Halmosi R, Palfi A, Feher G, Czopf L, Fulop A, et al. Cardioprotection by resveratrol: A human clinical trial in patients with stable coronary artery disease. Clin Hemorheol Microcirc. 2012;50(3):179-87.

9.            Tomé-Carneiro J, Gonzálvez M, Larrosa M, García-Almagro FJ, Avilés-Plaza F, Parra S, et al. Consumption of a grape extract supplement containing resveratrol decreases oxidized LDL and ApoB in patients undergoing primary prevention of cardiovascular disease: a triple-blind, 6-month follow-up, placebo-controlled, randomized trial. Mol Nutr Food Res. 2012;56(5):810-21.

10.          Moussa C, Hebron M, Huang X, Ahn J, Rissman RA, Aisen PS, et al. Resveratrol regulates neuro-inflammation and induces adaptive immunity in Alzheimer's disease. J Neuroinflammation. 2017;14(1):1.

11.          Chen J, Bai Q, Zhao Z, Sui H, Xie X. Resveratrol improves delayed r-tPA treatment outcome by reducing MMPs. Acta Neurol Scand. 2016;134(1):54-60.

12.          Bhatt JK, Thomas S, Nanjan MJ. Resveratrol supplementation improves glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Nutr Res. 2012;32(7):537-41.

13.          Brasnyó P, Molnár GA, Mohás M, Markó L, Laczy B, Cseh J, et al. Resveratrol improves insulin sensitivity, reduces oxidative stress and activates the Akt pathway in type 2 diabetic patients. Br J Nutr. 2011;106(3):383-9.

14.          Cottart C-H, Nivet-Antoine V, Beaudeux J-L. Review of recent data on the metabolism, biological effects, and toxicity of resveratrol in humans. Molecular Nutrition & Food Research. 2014;58(1):7-21.

 

Compound description

Resveratrol is a non-flavonoid polyphenol found in many fruits and vegetables, like peanuts, berries, and grapes (1, 2). This bioactive compound has drawn attention due to its numerous biological effects, like anticancer, antimicrobial, cardioprotective, antidiabetic, and antiaging properties (2, 3). In addition, resveratrol has been found to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant characteristics (4, 5).

 Properties

For decades, resveratrol has been investigated by many researchers for its various properties. It produces many of its effects by modulating several pathways (2). For example, the literature indicates that the bioactive compound is an activator of SIRT1 (a member of the sirtuin family of proteins) (5). SIRT1 is involved in cell survival, senescence, metabolism, inflammation and stress resistance(2). This, in opinion of some researchers, makes resveratrol a potential game changer in aging and longevity interventions (2, 3, 6).

The literature indicates that in addition to SIRT1, resveratrol plays a role in the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway (2). The latter pathway plays a role in inflammation and aging. The bioactive molecule has been found to promote NF-κB, therefore decreasing inflammatory mediators, like interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor-α (7). The outcome is the inhibition of inflammation, which can be used to treat many age-related diseases and promote healthy aging.

In its capacity as an anti-inflammatory agent, resveratrol has also been found to inhibit cyclooxygenases (2). The latter are enzymes that convert arachidonic acid into prostaglandin (lipid-based molecules that play a role in inflammation signaling and initiation). Suppression of the said pathway has been suggested to reduce inflammation (2). This highlights the resveratrol value in controlling a process that accelerates aging.

The antioxidant capacity of resveratrol has also been highlighted in the literature. In this context, research has shown that the bioactive molecule modulates the activity of nuclear factor erythroid-2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) (5, 7). NrF2 activation with resveratrol promotes antioxidant enzymes, like superoxide dismutase and catalase. The outcome of this process is reactive oxygen species (ROS) suppression, reducing oxidative stress (7). Excess ROS accelerates the aging process and the development of age-related disorders.

Based on the above, resveratrol acts on multiple processes and pathways within the body to promote healthy aging and longevity (3). Through these pathways, it produces many of its antiaging, cardioprotective, neuroprotective, and anti-inflammatory properties (2, 3, 5).

 

Use as a supplement

The value of resveratrol has been explored in both preclinical and clinical settings. In this context, researchers have highlighted the value of this bioactive compound in combating age-related pathologies, like cardiovascular disorders, neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes, and others (2, 7).

The cardioprotective properties of resveratrol have been highlighted in the literature, but some results are inconclusive. For example, clinical studies have shown that resveratrol supplementation improved ventricular function and reduced low-density lipoprotein (bad cholesterol) (2, 8). Also, the bioactive compound has been found to improve endothelial function, preventing atherosclerosis and coronary artery diseases. Further investigations revealed that resveratrol reduces inflammatory mediators and mechanisms that mediate atherosclerosis (2, 9). Other cardiovascular effects of the compound were reduced blood pressure and oxidative stress. These outcomes were attributed to resveratrol's antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, which are critical in fighting age-related diseases and promoting healthy longevity (2, 7). It is important to note that further research is needed to verify the effectiveness of this compound.

Through its ability to modulate SIRT1, 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, and its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, resveratrol has been hypothesized to be helpful in neurological disorders like Alzheimer’s disease and ischemic stroke (2, 10, 11). These studies have highlighted the capacity of the bioactive compound to fortify the brain by reducing inflammatory mediators’ permeability.

The value of resveratrol in glycemic control has also been explored in clinical studies. In this context, resveratrol use was found to improve glycated hemoglobin (a marker of glycemic control over three months) (2, 12). Also, the bioactive compound has been suggested to reduce insulin resistance and blood glucose and delay glucose peak after meals (2, 13). Also, the antioxidant properties of the molecule help fight oxidative stress, a contributor to insulin resistance and subsequent type 2 diabetes (2). It is important to note that some of these results do not help derive a definitive conclusion. 

The doses used in clinical studies ranged from 150mg to 3000mg. In our Marketplace under the vendor DoNotAge, you can find resveratrol as capsules (Pure Resveratrol). Pure Resveratrol provides the body with 1000mg of the bioactive molecule per serving (serving is two capsules). Also, DoNotAge provides resveratrol in micronized powder dosage form (Pure Resveratrol Powder).

 

Side effects

In small doses, resveratrol appears to be safe (14). Higher doses or more extended periods of use were not associated with serious adverse events. Examples include diarrhea, heartburn, increased or decreased appetite, vivid dreams, hot flashes, insomnia, flatulence, and other mild gastrointestinal (GIT) symptoms. In certain instances, like high doses, mild-to-moderate adverse events appeared, including the abovementioned GIT symptoms, chest pain, pruritis, itchy eyes, and dry mouth, among others (14). The literature indicates that the use of ≥500mg for prolonged periods produces reversible adverse events. Resveratrol is an inhibitor of cytochrome P450; therefore, it could interact with many medications. It is recommended to use this supplement only after consulting a licensed healthcare professional, like a physician or pharmacist.

References

1.            Ahmadi Z, Mohammadinejad R, Ashrafizadeh M. Drug delivery systems for resveratrol, a non-flavonoid polyphenol: Emerging evidence in last decades. Journal of Drug Delivery Science and Technology. 2019;51:591-604.

2.            Berman AY, Motechin RA, Wiesenfeld MY, Holz MK. The therapeutic potential of resveratrol: a review of clinical trials. npj Precision Oncology. 2017;1(1):35.

3.            Zhang L-X, Li C-X, Kakar MU, Khan MS, Wu P-F, Amir RM, et al. Resveratrol (RV): A pharmacological review and call for further research. Biomedicine & Pharmacotherapy. 2021;143:112164.

4.            Madeo F, Carmona-Gutierrez D, Hofer SJ, Kroemer G. Caloric Restriction Mimetics against Age-Associated Disease: Targets, Mechanisms, and Therapeutic Potential. Cell Metabolism. 2019;29(3):592-610.

5.            Smoliga JM, Baur JA, Hausenblas HA. Resveratrol and health – A comprehensive review of human clinical trials. Molecular Nutrition & Food Research. 2011;55(8):1129-41.

6.            Patel KR, Scott E, Brown VA, Gescher AJ, Steward WP, Brown K. Clinical trials of resveratrol. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. 2011;1215(1):161-9.

7.            Zhou D-D, Luo M, Huang S-Y, Saimaiti A, Shang A, Gan R-Y, et al. Effects and Mechanisms of Resveratrol on Aging and Age-Related Diseases. Oxidative medicine and cellular longevity. 2021;2021:9932218-.

8.            Magyar K, Halmosi R, Palfi A, Feher G, Czopf L, Fulop A, et al. Cardioprotection by resveratrol: A human clinical trial in patients with stable coronary artery disease. Clin Hemorheol Microcirc. 2012;50(3):179-87.

9.            Tomé-Carneiro J, Gonzálvez M, Larrosa M, García-Almagro FJ, Avilés-Plaza F, Parra S, et al. Consumption of a grape extract supplement containing resveratrol decreases oxidized LDL and ApoB in patients undergoing primary prevention of cardiovascular disease: a triple-blind, 6-month follow-up, placebo-controlled, randomized trial. Mol Nutr Food Res. 2012;56(5):810-21.

10.          Moussa C, Hebron M, Huang X, Ahn J, Rissman RA, Aisen PS, et al. Resveratrol regulates neuro-inflammation and induces adaptive immunity in Alzheimer's disease. J Neuroinflammation. 2017;14(1):1.

11.          Chen J, Bai Q, Zhao Z, Sui H, Xie X. Resveratrol improves delayed r-tPA treatment outcome by reducing MMPs. Acta Neurol Scand. 2016;134(1):54-60.

12.          Bhatt JK, Thomas S, Nanjan MJ. Resveratrol supplementation improves glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Nutr Res. 2012;32(7):537-41.

13.          Brasnyó P, Molnár GA, Mohás M, Markó L, Laczy B, Cseh J, et al. Resveratrol improves insulin sensitivity, reduces oxidative stress and activates the Akt pathway in type 2 diabetic patients. Br J Nutr. 2011;106(3):383-9.

14.          Cottart C-H, Nivet-Antoine V, Beaudeux J-L. Review of recent data on the metabolism, biological effects, and toxicity of resveratrol in humans. Molecular Nutrition & Food Research. 2014;58(1):7-21.

 

Article reviewed by
Dr. Ana Baroni MD. Ph.D.
SCIENTIFIC & MEDICAL ADVISOR
Quality Garant
Close

Dr. Ana Baroni MD. Ph.D.

Scientific & Medical Advisor
Quality Garant

Ana has over 20 years of consultancy experience in longevity, regenerative and precision medicine. She has a multifaceted understanding of genomics, molecular biology, clinical biochemistry, nutrition, aging markers, hormones and physical training. This background allows her to bridge the gap between longevity basic sciences and evidence-based real interventions, putting them into the clinic, to enhance the healthy aging of people. She is co-founder of Origen.life, and Longevityzone. Board member at Breath of Health, BioOx and American Board of Clinical Nutrition. She is Director of International Medical Education of the American College of Integrative Medicine, Professor in IL3 Master of Longevity at Barcelona University and Professor of Nutrigenomics in Nutrition Grade in UNIR University.

DISCOVER
HealthyLongevity.guide
4.6 / 5
Professional science-based education
250+ Articles, video lectures, webinars
Community of 1000+ verified professionals
Sign Up

Read the latest articles

News
Disease

Prostaglandin E2 potentially increases susceptibility to influenza A infection in the elderly

November 30, 2022

A new study tested whether age-related elevation in Prostaglandin E2 is a driver that impairs host defense against influenza.

Ehab Naim, MBA.
Article
Lifestyle
Prevention

Future healthy longevity starts at conception

November 29, 2022

The habits we develop as children significantly impact lifespan and healthspan in adulthood. Dietary choices, exercise, or for example daily screen time can lead to lasting changes in the organism.

Agnieszka Szmitkowska, Ph.D.
News
Body

Good oral health keeps the body stronger for longer

November 25, 2022

Current research on older adults suggests a possible link between oral and physical health, such as muscle strength, where poor oral health leads to adverse changes in musculoskeletal health.

Agnieszka Szmitkowska, Ph.D.
Article
Longevity
Medicine

Nutrient sensing and its role in aging

November 23, 2022

Nutrient sensing is one of the hallmarks of aging. Four key nutrient sensing mechanisms are: insulin signaling, mTOR, AMPK, and sirtuins.

Olena Mokshyna, PhD.
News
Lifestyle

Tai Chi Quan could improve several aspects of neurodegenerative disorders

November 23, 2022

Tai Chi has a lot of proven health benefits. Wang et al. analyzed 58 different studies to evalute what exactly is its effect on diseases, such as Parkinson’s or multiple sclerosis.

Ehab Naim, MBA.
News
Aging

Essential amino acid L-threonine prolongs healthspan thanks to ferritin

November 22, 2022

A study evaluated whether the metabolites whose concentrations are increased during caloric restriction reduce the age-related decline.

Agnieszka Szmitkowska, Ph.D.
News
Disease
Medicine

Acute aortic dissection can be caused by DNA methylation

November 17, 2022

In a recent study, DNA methylation was proven to be a risk factor for the acute aortic dissection.

Agnieszka Szmitkowska, Ph.D.
Article
Lifestyle
Longevity
Nutrition

The MIND Diet Promotes the Longevity of Cognitive Health

November 18, 2022

The MIND diet classifies 15 dietary components based on their effect on the brain, and recommends how many servings we should eat.

Jiří Kaloč
News
Aging
Longevity

Exploring microbiome diversity as a contributor to frailty

November 15, 2022

To evaluate the effect of microbiota diversity on health, Rashidah et al. reviewed microbiota composition, intestinal permeability, and inflammatory biomarkers in older adults.

Ehab Naim, MBA.
Article
Body
Supplements

Alpha-ketoglutarate in human trials against diseases and aging

November 11, 2022

Alpha-ketoglutarate (AKG) is a versatile endogenous compound that serves multiple functions in the body. It supports longevity thanks to its beneficial effects on cardiac, bone and muscle health.

Olena Mokshyna, PhD.
News
Aging
Disease
Longevity

Small extracellular vesicles from stem cells improve healthspan and lifespan in old mice

November 10, 2022

A recent study suggests that small extracellular vesicles could prevent age-related conditions and promote tissue regeneration.

Agnieszka Szmitkowska, Ph.D.
Article
Body
Lifestyle

How Much Exercise and What Type Is Needed to Live Longer?

November 6, 2022

Well planned exercise routine leads to prolonged healthspan. Several studies examined what is the ideal amount of exercise per week, or how many steps we should walk every day.

Jiří Kaloč
News
Prevention

Sleep duration during midlife and old age influences the risk of chronic diseases

November 4, 2022

A study examined the link between sleep duration and multimorbidity, and assessed whether sleep duration at the age of 50 influences the natural course of chronic diseases.

Ehab Naim, MBA.
Article
Disease
Lifestyle

Hypertension: How does high blood pressure influence the healthspan and lifespan?

November 3, 2022

1.2 billion people are affected by hypertension. Luckily, research shows that people can influence their blood pressure through simple changes in their diet and lifestyle.

Ehab Naim, MBA.
News
Aging

Inflammaging: How aging modulates the immune system

November 1, 2022

A study evaluated what is the impact of inflammaging on the adaptive and innate immune system.

Ehab Naim, MBA.
Article
Diagnostics
Aging

Epigenetic clocks: monitoring aging through DNA methylation

October 31, 2022

Epigenetic clocks provide one of the most accurate and easy ways to assess the real age of a human body. They also demonstrate encouraging results in the area of anti-aging intervention assessment.

Olena Mokshyna, PhD.
No items found.